The Information, by James Gleick: A Review

The books which surprise you the most often are books you have never read about, written by authors you have never heard of, upon which you stumble unsuspectedly. I can recall only one such case prior to the book I am reviewing today: “The Shadow of the Wind”, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón, currently my favorite fiction novel.

Indeed, I had never heard of James Gleick or his books when I found a peculiar black-and-white paperback on a dusty shelf during the annual “Braderie du Livre” at the USJ-CSM campus, a book clearance/sale kind-of event. Being a hunter and devourer of books tackling scientific subjects in a literary style, I immediately picked it up and added it to my ever-growing science book collection. This proved to be a good decision.

The book I am talking about is called: “The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood”.  Continue reading “The Information, by James Gleick: A Review”

Life of Pi: An Analysis

My story with ‘Life of Pi’ starts with the book, written by Canadian author Yann Martel. I had only heard of it when I bought it, about three years ago… and it was left unopened, until last November, when I heard the movie was coming out.

I set my mind to reading it before watching the movie in order to be able to compare both versions, something I often like to do.

The story: Political upheavals in India drive Pi’s family to sell their zoo and embark on a cargo ship along with the animals in search of a better life in Canada. Midway through the Pacific Ocean, the ship sinks, and Pi finds himself stranded on a lifeboat. Only he is not alone. A zebra, a hyena, an orangutan and a Bengal tiger will keep him company on an epic journey which will last for 227 days. Continue reading “Life of Pi: An Analysis”