Mouvement de l’ESIB Solidaire, or the Dream of Unity

We had a dream. In September, four of us had a dream. We dreamed that ESIB’s engineering students can put political and religious differences aside and work hand in hand for the benefit of the faculty. We dreamed that March 8 supporters, March 14 supporters, independents and neutrals can all remember the fact that university elections are nothing but academic and should always be that way. We had a dream that many had before us, but felt they were unable to realize. The past September, we wanted to see whether we would be able to make that change in an area that has seen anything but change.

We decided to share our dream with people who would be interested. With every new mind that joined us, our dream got bigger, better, more mature and more ambitious. We could see its potential, we could feel its thrill, and so, we decided to act upon it.

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Discovering Lebanon’s Contemporary Composers – The Music Edition #02

Last Friday, I attended the Lebanese Philharmonic Orchestra’s classical concert in St Joseph’s Church, Monot, as per usual. I had the utmost pleasure of listening to a live rendition of a classical piece called “Le Vin des Nuages”, composed by Bechara El Khoury, a Lebanese composer – not to be confused with the Lebanese president of the same name!

And it was, truly, a ravishing, stunning piece.

I don’t know why, in this country, we do not hear about our extremely talented musicians and classical composers. I had never heard of Lebanese classical composers before the LPO’s weekly Friday concert! Maybe it is because our people often associate classical music with the death of some politician, i.e. three days of non-stop depressing Bach and Mozart on the local TVs and radios! And they always choose the most depressing ones, don’t they?

Here is a selection of some of the most eminent contemporary Lebanese composers, all of which are highly regarded around the world. You will notice that it is not your fair share of classical and instrumental music. You will feel the innovation, the genius, the sadness, the wonder, the war, the noise, the theatrics and the madness that every single Lebanese possesses in the blood, as part of the heritage our dear country has bestowed upon us. And you will be surprised, this I promise you. Continue reading “Discovering Lebanon’s Contemporary Composers – The Music Edition #02”

What You’re Missing Out On Every Friday Night!

Oh yes, you are missing out big time!

Almost every Friday, at 8:30 PM, a one-of-a-kind concert takes place in St Joseph Church in Monot. The prestigious Lebanese Philharmonic Orchestra, lead by the most prominent conductors of the world, offers each week a program comprising 3 to 4 classical pieces: from the masters, Mozart, Beethoven, Bach and Tchaikovsky, to contemporary Lebanese musicians and composers such as Zad Moultaka, Charbel Rouhana and Omar Rahbani.

I reckon not everybody is familiar with the world of classical music, but let me assure you, you will never regret attending a concert of such scale. Allow me tell you about the concert I just got back from. Continue reading “What You’re Missing Out On Every Friday Night!”

The Leonardo Da Vinci Exhibition @ Platea

Leonardo Da Vinci is most renowned for his exceptional talent as the painter of the Mona Lisa. Not everyone knows him as the genius who invented flying machines and war tools! Indeed, Da Vinci’s notes and diaries, called Codices, feature countless numbers of plans and drawings bringing to life his ingenuous inventions. Unfortunately, the original prototypes were all lost with time.

The idea for a traveling exhibition of Leonardo’s machines was first conceived in Melbourne, Australia, then developed in collaboration with the museum dedicated to him in Florence, Italy. Italian craftsmen rebuilt more than 60 machines, based on Da Vinci’s drawings, and using the same material available at the time. They cover a wide range of scientific fields: mechanics, hydraulics, aviation, etc.

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An Open Letter To The Lebanese Government

To the majority* of the Lebanese politicians currently** in office, to the Lebanese people, and to all whom the following may concern.

Nicolas Sehnaoui, current Lebanese Minister of Telecommunication, posted on Twitter the following question:

I wanted to reply to his question with something cynical and snarky, but then I thought twice about it… And as a result, here is my answer:

I never would become a Lebanese minister, let alone have anything to do with Lebanese politics.

Why? Simple. Because the first requirements to being elected are corruption and dishonesty.

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An Unusual Source Of Inspiration

Ever thought about the criteria you base yourself on when you label a person as your inspiration? In other words, what is the thing that makes you admire a person?

Usually, I would reply the level of education, achievements, inventions, talent, skills in a particular field, etc.

Usually, if you ask me to name people who inspire me, I would reply: Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs, Jared Leto, Carlos Ruiz Zafón, Mother Teresa, Michael Jackson, Edgar Allan Poe, Thomas Edison, Winston Churchill, J. K. Rowling, Mahatma Gandhi, Beethoven, Stieg Larrson, Richard Feynman, Pope John Paul II, Jane Austen, and the list goes on and on…

These people are relatively well-known; indeed, they have their own Wikipedia pages, they have fans, they are famous, even if posthumously…

But then, you meet people, nobodies, poor people, old people, and you’re stricken. You know nothing about them, yet you admire them. What is their secret?

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